Beyond Egypt: other people worth sanctioning in MENA

Masses of people flooded the streets to protest the endemic corruption of their governments in Cairo, Tunis and many other Arab cities. Following these uprisings six years ago, sanctions were imposed on public officials for misappropriating public funds. Here’s a look at recent European Union (EU) actions, such as asset freezes and visa restrictions. Egypt[…]

Egypt’s (modest) efforts to bring back Mubarak’s billions

  It was the anger against the widespread corruption of Mubarak’s regime that brought millions of Egyptians on the streets in early 2011. In the aftermath of the revolution, Egyptians put a lot of hopes that they would get back the billions of Euros stolen by Mubarak and his family to invest them in building[…]

What are the EU sanctions and why are they important?

During the protests in Tunisia and Egypt in 2011, which led to the removal of longtime dictators Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and Hosni Mubarak, the Council of the European Union did something remarkable and, at the time, relatively unprecedented – it issued a regulation to its member states which pre-emptively froze the assets held[…]

Making asset recovery great again

Many people are discussing passionately what the Trump era will look like. We should ask ourselves: what will happen to US policies on recovering stolen assets? Will the US administration continue in its anti-corruption efforts worldwide? Although we should wait to see what happens, the premises are far from promising. Many have criticised the conflicts[…]

6 years later, where are Mubarak´s billions?

Over the last 20 years, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, his family and close circle of advisers allegedly enriched themselves through partnerships in powerful Egyptian companies, profiting from their political power and illicit enrichment from public money, according to numerous reports. Evidence shows that their wealth—obtained from illegal activities—was deposited or invested not just in[…]